You are currently browsing the monthly archive for December 2011.

Taiwan’s Next Media Animation has the scoop on the succession plans.

Now that the Winter break is coming, what to read in between decorating, cooking, eating, drinking and being merry?

The most exciting theoretical computer science development of the year was the improved efficiency of matrix multiplication by Stother and Vassilevska-Williams. Virginia’s 72-page write-up will certainly keep many people occupied.

Terence Tao is teaching a class on expanders, and posting the lecture notes, of exceptional high quality. It is hard to imagine something that would a more awesome combination, to me, than Terry Tao writing about expanders. Maybe a biopic on Turing’s life, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, written by Dustin Lance Black and directed by Clint Eastwood.

Meanwhile, Ryan O’Donnell has been writing a book on analysis of boolean function, by “serializing” it on a blog platform.

Now that I have done my part, you do yours. If I wanted to read a couple of books (no math, no theory) during the winter, what would you recommend. Don’t recommend what you think I would like, recommend what you like best, and why.

It might be too late to book a flight, but if you already are in the Bay Area, be aware that tomorrow Dan Spielman will deliver the 3rd Motwani Lecture at 11am in the CIS auditorium of the Paul Allen building, which is across the street from Gates.

Dan will talk about sparsification of graphs and matrices.

From an interview with Ed Mango, head of NASA’s commercial crew program, in which he discusses safety requirements for commercial entities who want to subcontract flights to the ISS from NASA.

Chaikin: And the probability of “loss of crew” has to be better than 1 in 1000?

Mango: Yes and no. What we’ve done is we’ve separated those into what you need for ascent and what you need for entry. For ascent it’s 1 in 500, and independently for entry it’s 1 in 500. We don’t want industry … to [interpret the 1-in-1,000 requirement] to say, “We’ve got a great ascent; we don’t need as much descent protection.” In reality we’ve got to protect the life of the crew all the time.

Now [the probability for] the mission itself is 1 in 270. That is an overall number. That’s loss of crew for the entire mission profile, including ascent, on-orbit, and entry. The thing that drives the 1 in 270 is really micrometeorites and orbital debris … whatever things that are in space that you can collide with. So that’s what drops that number down, because you’ve got to look at the 210 days, the fact that your heat shield or something might be exposed to whatever that debris is for that period of time. NASA looks at Loss of Vehicle the same as Loss of Crew. If the vehicle is damaged and it may not be detected prior to de-orbit, then you have loss of crew.

What does “yes” mean in the “yes and no” answer? Also, with a 1/500 probability of accident at takeoff and an independent 1/500 probability of accident at landing, we are already at a 1/250.2 probability of accident, so how do we get to 1/270 after adding accidents in mid-flight?

In not entirely unrelated news, a member of the board of Florida’s 3rd district took, and failed, the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), a standardized test, as documented in two posts on the Washington Post blog.

Relevant quote:

“I won’t beat around the bush. The math section had 60 questions. I knew the answers to none of them, but managed to guess ten out of the 60 correctly. On the reading test, I got 62% . In our system, that’s a ‘D,’ and would get me a mandatory assignment to a double block of reading instruction.

“It seems to me something is seriously wrong. I have a bachelor of science degree, two masters degrees, and 15 credit hours toward a doctorate. I help oversee an organization with 22,000 employees and a $3 billion operations and capital budget, and am able to make sense of complex data related to those responsibilities….

Here is a sample of the math portion of the 10th grade FCAT, the most advanced one. Sample question: “An electrician charges a $45 fee to make a house call plus an hourly rate for labor. If the electrician works at one house for 3 hours and charges $145.50 for the job, what is the electrician’s hourly rate?” You can use a calculator.

a

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